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Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)
be satisfied as long as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. no, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. i am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution, and staggered by the winds of police brutality. you have been the veterans of creative suffering. continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redementive. go back to mississippi. go back to alabama. go back to south carolina. go back to georgia, go back to louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities. knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friend friends -- [ cheers and applause ] >> -- though even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow i still hav
see the city name down on the lower left, mississippi. the number next to the city is the derivative of the gps marker for this google location and i sort of transposed the numbers and used that. i wanted to connotate that virtual world and also there was a visual connection to the photographic heritage that was pretty wild. on top of this moment in time, there is also a breaking down of the imagery thaps in the google pictures themselves, most of these are lo fi and i chose that i guess because of the esthetics. it did not contain the same look as these and it also erode the truth and makes the lens a little bit blurry, it alters things from a technical point of view. so, you could see these pictures that sort of describe them as drive-by pictures that we are drive-by really captures this and not necessarily immersive in any way. it is literally a car driving by capturing a moment. some of this has been done in the past, walker evans took pictures out of a moving vehicle. in fact, strangely, right upstairs in the library before this talk i was looking through my side and i have on t
a century in the making. edith hill cannon grew up in the '60s in mississippi. >> as much as my parents tried to protect me, you couldn't escape discrimination. >> reporter: do you ever forget the discrimination? >> uh-huh. no. >> reporter: she listened to a who's who of celebrities and politicians including the daughters of two presidents, lynda johnson robb and caroline kennedy and two former presidents, jimmy carter and bill clinton. >> this march and that speech changed america. they opened minds, they melted hearts and they moved millions. >> reporter: the event included a recreation of the 1963 march through the streets of washington that ended at the lincoln memorial. setting up a nearly five-hour program under cloudy skies and periodic rain. congressman john lewis returned today, the only speaker here to share the stage in 1963 with dr. king. >> this moment in our history has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> reporter: bill tate says he was here, too, 50 years ago. that day when dr. king made that speech, what were you thinking then? >> i knew we were in a moment
nation may be more divided than back then. i am from mississippi. my father worked heavily to desegregate schools in mississippi. my mother did not he a black high school, my about father had to build it. lori: as reverend jesse jack jackson pointed out, african-americans are freer but less equal. >> that does reflect my sentiment. unemployment in black community is on the increase. we -- >> 12-point 6%. black unemployment. versus 6.6, reverend. >> it is not just a black problem. there are disparities in other communities, they have benefitted by that movent. i think all of us have to get engaged. not just a government problem. that is a key point president oba mentioned. everyone has to get involved am 73% of children born out of wedlock that is the government, some individuals need to hear what is happening at their children, in living rooms, men and women need to take responsibility. >> lori, reverend is right, government is supposed to protect the consumer, but up to individual responsibility, "it takes a village" to raise a child. with everything going on in the communities, we need
of mississippi arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought is let freedom ring. >> he played a spiritual song he has been listening to since the childhood. they helped them during the struggles. >> in the words of doctor martin luther king,jr. equality for everyone. freedom. you remind me that i have to be conscious of the inequality that does exist in the world. i don't know how much longer it's going to take with another 50 years or what. we have to keep the march going. >> u.s. secretary of defense chuck hagel joined the minster defense leaders in the southeast asian nations. it contains a number of security challenges including disputes over the south china sea. the agenda was overtaken by events in the mideast and talk of possible u.s. military action against syria. the obama administration identified the asia pacific region as an area of importance for the united states. hagel attended the asean defense minster's meeting on wednesday. he will join a wider discussion on thursday when minsters from china, japan and other countries join their cou
was held to honor his dream. ezra brown is a saxophone player from the state of mississippi. he arrived in tokyo on august 28th to commemorate the historic day. the message he brought with him? let freedom ring. ♪ brown played a traditional spiritual song that he has been listening to since his childhood. it's a piece that people in the civil rights movement sang in church to help them during their struggle. >> in the words of dr. martin luther king jr., let's keep in our heart and our mind and our soul about universal peace, equality for everyone, freedom. ♪ >> well, it reminds me that i have to be conscious of the inequalities that does exist now in the world. >> i don't know how much longer it's going to take, if it's going to be another 50 years or what, but we still got a ways to go, you know, and we still got to kind of keep the march going. ♪ >>> a series of bombs have exploded in shia muslim areas in and around the iraqi capital baghdad. the blasts killed at least 40 people. another 160 were wounded. iraqi authorities say insurgents detonated bombs in 14 places including p
she wore for the 1963 march. she remembered the opposite progression in her native mississippi. >> coming no north for the marc, and the federal government on the conditions down south did, in fact, give us th the bear brd base of support. >> crediting the civil rights movement for gay lesbian rights, yet there was the recognition of unmet goals of 19th 63. >> reporter: 50 years later these marchs are repeating the same demands economic and political. jobs and justice. president obama acknowledg acknd progress had stalled. those inequities would have to be tackled in every level of society. >> the successful man who doesn't have to but pays his workers a fair wage and then offers a shot to a man, an ex-con, who may be down on his luck. he's marching. >> reporter: he talked about the politics of division that polarize the government. >> gay rights have been critical of coca-cola sponsorship of the olympics in russia. it accuses coca-cola of supporting hate because of its support of olympics. >> we go to the world's oldest film festival. >> reporter: the high octane glamour of th
rather have a brand new state of the art pipeline traveling down the margin mississippi and on the trunk to be cut tanker cars and trucks. >> host: there was a story that was reported by the newspaper saying that the decision would likely be until the inspector general looked at the investigation of the conflict of interest complete and the inspector general looked at the complete of the environmental research mismanagement that prepares the environmental impact statement on the keystone xl on the central conflict. >> guest: it's not a new story. that came out and was thoroughly investigated. my understanding is that there were no conflicts found. what you are starting to see frankly is the recycling of a lot of defense. keep in mind, that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite the cross border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this environment environmental impact we could have built the empire state building five times buy now. we have completed world war ii in less time. so again as an institutional list a
francisco then to go back to mississippi or texas or whether we have escaped from. this is the only place on earth that we have so we have a special bloogs to maintain a sanctuary for lgbt people. i think this is the moment where the city is recognizing there's a problem and not all gay people are rich and thank you for your support >> thank you. >> good afternoon, commissioners. i'm at lyric. i feel it's important for the commissioners to approve this as a former queer trans youth it's difficult four us i mean the queer and queer variant. when i was in the homeless shelter it was difficult i faced many prejudices. even when shelter say they address accident queer or the transgenders i know they don't. i notice a lot of any sisters from the age of 16 to 24 their subject to a lot of abuse and be it physical or verbal they suffer abuse in general. it's hard to exist in a closed-minded society. you're not seen as the person you are but whatever someone else knows you represent. so many of my sisters are forced out into the street to do prostitution or anyway to make a living. i feel as tho
, several other states said we made a big mistake. and mississippi had already done a better job than many and has now mandated its civil rights to be taught in all of the high schools in mississippi to read a great step forward for the state of mississippi which had -- north carolina has become the new mississippi now. so mississippi lost its place. i will let someone else answer the question. that is one of my students. a bright young man. >> i would just say it is the story itself at morehouse college for sure. we are going on line with some things and converging the expertise and the brain power. we have one of our professor. a couple things have happened in the country recently. the monument here in washington was about $120 million. and then the civil rights museum in atlanta. here is morehouse college that built a chapel in 1979 with a statute out front. we say that we need to convert more resources to really undergird this tradition at morehouse and that is what we are going to do. >> my name is jane and i had the honor of working at the brookings institution previously give it my
for the head start association. our office is located is -- our office is located in jackson, mississippi. i've been with head start since 1980 and am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration. >> martha coven, associate director for education and community and labor at the office of management and budget which is part of the executive office of the president. so we on behalf of the present over to the budget for the number of federal agencies including education. the ministry for children and families at hhs where the head start progress. >> i'm the director of policy and planning at the office of head start within the department of health and human services and the start of the early childhood career 20 years ago in head start agency in brooklyn. so i'm really happy to be here today. >> i'm sharon parrott from the center on budget and policy priorities were on the vice president's budget policy and economic opportunity. this is the second go-round for me at the center on budget and just prior to returning in november i worked for secretaries and police at t
hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capitol hill itself, until all of the residents of the very seat of our
office is located in jackson mississippi. i have been with a head start since 1988 and i am excited to be here today to share some of our concerns about sequestration . >> i'm the associate director for education income maintenance of labor, part of the executive office of the president. we oversee the budgets of a number of federal agencies including education and the administration for children family. >> and the director of policy and planning. i started my 20 years ago. i'm really happy to be it today. >> was president budgets, policy, and economic cover tentative. i worked for secretary sibila is set the department of health and human services. >> i'm the managing director for economic policy here at the center for american progress. deficits and debt. >> was wondering if we could start with you. we heard numbers mentioned in the introduction. i wonder he might drill down on the more. the office has some additional information. maybe even what we might be seeing if sequestration continues. >> let me start. our topline numbers of children now. that's about 6,000 infants and todd
helped organize the lunch counter sit-ins in mississippi. >> i had my arm in dr. king's and that was special. >> reporter: hundreds commemorated the 1963 march for jobs and freedom with a march through the streets of washington. >> this march and that speech changed america. >> reporter: a half century later, it was a day to reflect on how far the country has come and renew dr. king's call for jobs and freedom. danielle nottingham, cbs news, washington. >> oprah and former presidents clinton and carter were among today's speakers. >>> we are just more than 2.5 hours from the bay bridge closing and if you don't have your alternative commute worked out, you need to get some plan in place because it is going to be a nightmare. we have seen it before in the past when they have closed down the bay bridge. so at 8:00 tonight it closes. but we found out today that a lot of people have a lot of ideas about how to get around this closure. >> we're going to have to probably stay away from the city. if we have to go into the city we'll probably have to go around 92 or perhaps the
george. >>, in mississippi, in alabama, people were struggling to have the right to citizenship, the right to vote, the right to public accommodations. people were being jailed and this was a culmination of those efforts to come to washington and petition the federal government to intervene and insure that in fact all citizens have equal treatment. >> annie, you were there, too, 50 years ago. again, you were there today for the march today. how did being there in 1963 impact who you became no. life. i was 17, and i had a summer job. i was on my way to college and i realized that there were people all over the country who i was aworking class examined kid of immigrant parents but still had this genetic advantage and needed to go down and say i'm standing with everyone else, because it was so important. i went into college thinking i would be a high school english teacher and i said no, i needed to go into journalism to stand up, bear witness and maybe make a difference. >> martha, you've written about the ways in which the women were at times overlooked. there was only one woman
destruction in mississippi and louisiana, and claimed so many lives in and around the city of new orleans. august 29th, 2005, forever known as the day the levees broke. fast forward to today and though there's been a massive rebuilding effort, some areas still remain abandoned. but new neighborhoods are popping up, and officials say 80% of the prestorm population has returned. >>> now, the picture of a day that might be a first at the vatican. take a look at pope francis, who's been quite active on twitter. there he is smiling and posing for a sophie, a group of young visitors, inside st.peter's basilica. the people in the group snapping pictures of themselves on a cell phone. >>> we've got good news to report tonight. when folks return for their end of summer break on labor day, a good friend of ours will be coming back to work as well. brian has been given the all-clear from his doctors after knee replacement surgery just over three weeks ago. our own doctor, nancy snyderman, met up with him at the jersey shore. >> i expected a -- may i come back at two weeks? can i push to three? but i
meaningful progress, we will march through virginia, through mississippi and several other places. do your remember? >> i remember all that. i was donated to the march on washington committee and my task was distributing john's speech, the original speech to member of the press who were seated down below lincoln, still above on the steps. i passed out these copies of john's speech and pointed out to them, that john would be the only speaker speaking that day who talked about black people instead of negroes or colored people as was the fashion. i thought and we thought that this demonstrated how militant we were and how different we were and better and superior we were from the other civil rights organizations. none of the reporters made any objection. [laughter] >> what did you mean by militant? >> i meant aggressive. nothing harmful or violent. i have always been upset by people who say, they are so militant. they equate it with violence. it is not necessarily equatable with violence. it just means somebody is it aggressively in pursuit of his ideas. we thought we were more militant than
civil rights workers dead, i knew there was killing in 1964 in mississippi. that's why i think we have to press on. and those of us in the congress have to find a way to fix what the supreme court did. >> rose: john lewis, thank you. >> thank you very much. good to see you. >> rose: the book is called "march." it is a history of the civil rights movement and you will understand more of the trieldz and difficult times and the triumph of the civil rights movement in america as it took place from the streets to legislation in congress to speeches and motivated by the sacrifice of thousands of people. >> i would simply like to say i think this has been one of the great days of america. >> rose: we continue this evening as we take note of the 50th anniversary of the march oning with. on august 28, dr. martin luther king delivered his "i have a dream" speech. it was an american important moment in history, and paved the way for the voting rights act of 1965. half a century later, our first african american president has been elected for a second term but we're still far from realizing equali
think it's like meals on wheels. you take big issues like social security. in rural areas of mississippi and alabama where there are a lot of poor people of both backgrounds black and white, they aren't on plantations. these are workers. and they really care about these basic social programs. and yet obama fights for them and they don't ally with them. >> they don't. and they think they will be better off on their own. >> i know you're friends with bill cosby and i in ways worship the guy. here's when the president didn't get away from delivering a tough message. he didn't sound like the lefty socialist his critics on the right portray him as. here he is. >> if we're honest with ourselves, we'll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us claiming to push for change lost our way. the anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots. legitimate grievances against police brutality tipped into excuse making for criminal behavior. and what had once been a call for equality of opportunity, the chance for all americans to work hard and get ahead was too oft
lou in greenwood, mississippi, james orange an activist in birmingham, alabama. jose williams. i thought of those people, i thought of baker, and so when i thought of them, i began to cry. i began to cry, because i knew that there contribution had changed america, by the way, i said this directly to the president of the united states. i reminded him yesterday when i had the honor to see him in the reception, even when he was out in california. i -- and you know, he knows this, that when he was elected, for example and there were several people at a faculty home celebrating the election of barack obama. and people in the room started to cry, and someone said to me, professor jones, did you think you live long enough to see an african-american elected president? i said no. but excuse me, my tears are not for the election of barack obama's president. my tears are for all of those persons that i personally knew, personally knew -- i called them wintertime soldiers, who made his election possible. and the president today and even earlier, he reflected that in the very poignant and mov
-old emmitt till was murdered by two white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now.
angel alumni groups exist from schools including harvard, march kwet and the university of mississippi. schools with a strong sense of spirit and entrepreneurial, computer, math and science programs. bayler university is one of them. >> we are one of four kpos selected to actually present at their angel breakfast. after the presentation we had six weeks of due diligence where they had to go through and interview us and try to poke holes in the business and makd sure we will a viable investment. >> allowing small and medium size businesses to set up e-commerce sites in a few minutes. preferred stock giving grubs money for marketing new hires. he says it should get the firm to its goal of revenue in the low 7 figures in 2014. that's a score for students, alumni as well as the school, bill. >> that's a great idea. get those alumni in there and use their expertise and funds. >> you mentor them and fund them as well. >> thanks very much. stocks made it two for two but just barely. what happens tomorrow? >> stock pros will give you a leg up on friday's stock market action, bill, when we come
of free four little girls in a birmingham church and the chicago teenager on vacation in mississippi. it is a new day 50 years later and a better day, but the day is not over. today struggle for civil rights, social justice, and economic opportunity to man our engagement and our voice. to realize fully our dream we must raise our voices and take action. we must lift our voices to challenge government and our community and neighbors to be better. we must lift our voices for wages that enable families to take care of themselves, for a health care system that erases disparities, for communities and homes without violence, for clean air and water to protect our environment for future generations, and for a just justice system. we must lift our voice for the value of our boat and have our votes counted without interference. as we stand here today, dr. king would know, and john lewis certainly knows, that today is not just a commemoration or celebration. it is a call to action for the work remains undone in the communities that remain unchanged. our foremothers and forefathers 50 years ago
south carolina tonight. plenty hot in nashville, for mississippi and vanderbilt. up to 91 in honolulu where hawaii plans to knock off southern california. that was a very well-written weather college football -- >> it was. i feel like i know what's going on in weather and college football now. >> who did that, jack? >> had to be jack. kudos to jack! round of applause. [ applause ] from all of us. >>> while we're on the sports theme, let's go to the u.s. open where venus williams its out! >> she battled and battled again in a marathon match against her opponent from china. went all the way to third set, tiebreaker. williams came up just short. this is the third year in a row, williams exited the singles tournament after two rounds. she's also playing doubles with her sister serena. >> before you think the tournament is totally serious. check out a lighter moment there. check that out. it happened during the women's first round match, briefly delayed by the squirrel. unwanted visitor took its time getting off the court as well. eventually tucked in behind a scoreboard. never to be seen
in damage. changing that area of louisiana, mississippi, alabama, the gulf coast, forever. and you juxtapose that with the fact this has been a quiet hurricane season. as a matter of fact, the last time we were hurricane-free in august was 2002. hurricane gustav on september 11, 2002. why is it quiet? as the systems come off the african coast they hit drier stabler air and die out. we don't see any change coming but out west they have been active. moisture is going to make its way into the southwest so over the weekend look for from 1 to 2 inches of rain from southern california into the southwest. there may be some flash flooding. we're going to get to your local forecast in the next 30 seconds. r who's secretly serving steaks from walmart. it's a steak over! dude, it's so good. it's juicy. it's nice and tender. only one in five steaks is good enough to be called walmart choice premium steak. all these steaks are from walmart. oh my gosh! top ten most tender steaks i've had. i'm going to start buying meat at walmart. walmart's prices are so low you could have steak at every game. it's 100%
, and it is a great honor. somebody who started out their r adult years as a reporter in jackson, mississippi, this is a great humbling honor. i am pleased to be here with people who have helped make me who i am and supported me in this work. bond, whoah, julian has been one of my hero since i was a small child. [applause] julian's wife pam horwitz amid the great members of the naacp staff come including -- is leading the charge on our work to secure voting rights across this country. iriethankful to jeff and for extending this welcome to the press club. to the press club staff and ms. cook. ever clearerecomes that the media continues to play and inform our conversation about race and being that the conscience of our country. we are grateful to "the new york and the role it played in helping stop and frisk in new york city. today i want to thank the man who is been my cocaptain of the national staff for the last five years, roger. chief operating officer, and last year you might recall there were a lot of questions. indeed, throughout 2011 and 2012, or questions, we would like folks turn out
euphemism mississippi appendectomy to give voice to the experience of poor black women in the south who were sterilized against their knowledge, an issue that has been in the news in the last couple of of weeks in hell of vonya and lastly i want to offer for you the black and the party was a health social movements. the black panther movement is a rorschach test for how we think about blacks politics in the last 20th century in particular but what we don't appreciate so much is that they were deeply engage and involved in issues of health activism health equality and access to medical care services in the united states. in particular as i discussed in my book they were engaged in getting people information to access to services that were under mentioned that we didn't know enough about, that the services were underutilized or not provided enough for such as sickle cell amenia -- a mania -- sickle cell anemia. harry its prior look that many of you probably know medical apartheid the black panther party was engaged in protecting black minis from overexposure to the bad forces of medical experi
a barge down the mississippi, tanker cars, or trucks. >> there's a story that was first report bid the hill newspaper saying that the e he on would likely be uld -- >> that's actedly not a new storyifment that came out a couple years ago and was investigated. and my understanding is there were no conflicts found. what you're starting to see is a recycling of a lot of events. keep in mind that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite cross-border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this is now taking longer again, we could have built the empire state building five times by now, we completed world war ii in less time. so at some point you start to say, we've had four studies. we've had this, we've had that. at some point the question is has this policy really been high jacked or are we still on path? > eric from our democrat's line. >> we have environmental studies. we've also had practical xperience with spills. i don't know where o you're getting your safety record from, the 99.999%. if one of these pipelin
't mississippi and it wasn't alabama and you can see that even today, certainly there were racial and ethnic tensions but they were not so universal that interracial cooperation was rendered impossible. >> the belief is fading that answers can be found and we're losing the will to search for it. >> reporter: the war effort ended, the car business slowed. factories left for the suburbs and other states. sprawling neighborhoods began to empty. it was to the long before the hundreds of to you sands of people who transformed this city were suddenly nowhere to be found. >> so where do we go from here? how did we get here? we're going to look at that but also as we were driving in yesterday, noticed all the blithed buildings, so much work to be done in this city, but also so many positive things happening and so many beautiful aspects of this city's legacy that we're going to be talking about this morning straight ahead. >> mike, this has been happening slowly. you know, you can see it when you came here in the '70s. remember 1980 i think it was, they had the super bowl here. my god, that was 30 s
Search Results 0 to 35 of about 36 (some duplicates have been removed)